The Adventurers’ Club of Los Angeles

A Gathering Place for Those Who Leave the Beaten Path in Search of Adventure

All photos in the slideshow are by, for, or about members of ACLA.

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Date(s) - Thursday, November 9, 2017
12:00 am - 11:59 pm

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A Gentlemen’s Night

Social hour 6pm, dinner is served at 7, program begins in Chase Hall at 8pm.

November 9, 2017 – Barbara Schultz

Amelia Earhart’s Last Flight

 

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Barbara Schultz

In March 1937, Amelia Earg\hart flew to Hawaii with fellow pilot Paul Mantz to begin this flight. Earhart lost control of the plane on takeoff, however, and the plane had to be sent to the factory for repairs. In June, she went to Miami to again begin a flight around the world, this time with Fred Noonan as her navigator.

After flying across the Atlantic as a passenger in 1928, Amelia Earhart’s next goal was to achieve a transatlantic crossing alone. In 1927, Charles Lindbergh became the first person to make a solo nonstop flight across the Atlantic. In 1932, exactly five years after Lindbergh’s flight, Earhart became the first woman to repeat the feat. Her popularity grew even more. She was the undisputed queen of the air! Still, she wanted to achieve more.

She decided that her next trip would be to fly around the world.

In March 1937, she flew to Hawaii with fellow pilot Paul Mantz to begin this flight. Earhart lost control of the plane on takeoff, however, and the plane had to be sent to the factory for repairs.

In June, she went to Miami to again begin a flight around the world, this time with Fred Noonan as her navigator. No one knows why, but she left behind important communication and navigation instruments. Perhaps it was to make room for additional fuel for the long flight. The pair made it to New Guinea in 21 days, even though Earhart was tired and ill. During the next leg of the trip, they departed New Guinea for Howland Island, a tiny island in the middle of the Pacific Ocean. July 2, 1937, was the last time Earhart and Noonan communicated with a nearby Coast Guard ship. They were never heard from again.

The U.S. Navy conducted a massive search for Earhart and Noonan that continued for more than two weeks. Unable to accept that Earhart had simply disappeared and perished, some of her admirers believed that she was a spy or was captured by enemies of the United States. The Navy submitted a report following its search, which included maps of search areas. Neither the plane nor Earhart nor Noonan were ever found. No one knows for sure what happened, but many people believe they got lost and simply ran out of fuel and died. Amelia Earhart was less than a month away from her 40th birthday. 

Barbara Schultz brief biography

A member of the 99s Museum of Women Pilots, Barbara Schultz is a noted aviation historian and author with four books in print:  Pancho: The Biography of Florence Lowe Barnes; Wedell-Williams Air Service; Flying Carpets, Flying Wings: The Biography of Moye W. Stephens; and Endorsed by Earhart: How Amelia Financed her Flying.  In addition to her books and AAHS journal articles, she has been a consultant and participant in three aviation documentaries: The Happy Bottom Riding Club, Breaking through the Clouds, and The Katherine Cheung Story.  Her projects are well-researched and include many first-person interviews with pioneering pilots.  Barbara earned her pilot’s license in 1978, purchased a 1950 Cessna 140A, and married her test pilot husband Phil. They live on their own airport in California’s Antelope Valley and own several classic aircraft.